A few weeks ago, I had the following written conversation with a friend during church who proceeded to blog about it:

 

 

Our conversation verbatim-

Me: I think it is interesting how at first there was a lot of attention on the Muslim Congressman, but then Glenn Beck made it very un-PC to do so. I think the Congressman’s issue will help Romney’s case. People will accept Romney’s case a little bit better.

Sherpa: Really? I think 95% of the population accepted the Muslim Congressman.

Me: Personally, I think Beck said it to get the elephant (donkey?) out of the room. Someone needs to do the same to Romney. Ask him on national news why we should trust him not to call Salt Lake.

Sherpa: I think the Muslim Congressman is a blip on the nation’s radar. I don’t think people will think, “Hey, there’s a Muslim Congressman, maybe a Mormon President isn’t a bad idea.” However, the fact that more and more prominent Mormons that are respected in government positions and in positions of prominence in communities throughout the country, and not just in the West will help. Now we do need a Stewart to interview him and get that coverage out there.

I ask the blogosphere for further discussion. Why is it politically incorrect to express fear that a Muslim Congressman may have other motives, but it is okay to have TV shows mocking Mormons, or blogs expressing anti-Mormon hatred?

Here’s the thing.  A congressman serves a district and is one of 435.  A President of the United States is the most powerful man in the world.  Having a muslim congressman effects only a small percentage of the United States.  The president of the United States effects well, the United States domestically and abroad.  To draw a comparison is faulty.

 Second, the Congressman was sworn in using a Q’ran.  Mormon Congressmen have been sworn in using a Book of Mormon, and there wasn’t a media flap about that. 

Plus, people had some concerns about the congressman, they were addressed and it moved out of the news cycle. 

Looking at the public opinion polls, Americans are less concerned about having a mormon President then having a muslim president. 

Pulling the “politically correct card” in this situation is unjustified, as the two situations are not alike.   

Advertisements